We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.
Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.
Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.
What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.
Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.
Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.
Who are you to ask that question?
–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)
(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)
ZoomInfo
We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.
Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.
Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.
What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.
Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.
Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.
Who are you to ask that question?
–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)
(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)
ZoomInfo
We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.
Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.
Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.
What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.
Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.
Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.
Who are you to ask that question?
–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)
(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)
ZoomInfo
We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.
Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.
Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.
What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.
Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.
Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.
Who are you to ask that question?
–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)
(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)
ZoomInfo
We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.
Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.
Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.
What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.
Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.
Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.
Who are you to ask that question?
–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)
(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)
ZoomInfo

We have never lost Paradise, but human consciousness tells us we have lost it and that we have to regain it.  But in fact, Paradise has never been lost, Paradise is never to be therefore regained.   We are in Eden, just as we are now.

Be, and at the same time, not be.  To be or not to be, but then, to be and not to be.  Both at the same time.  The best thing is to be living, and yet not living.  Dying yet not dying.  That is the object of Zen discipline.

Zen is a floating cloud…unattached.

What characterizes Zen is this: simplicity and sincerity, and freedom.  This is the one most important.  Real freedom to see things in their “suchness,” I would say.  That is freedom.

Sometimes so-called facts are not so important.  But what scholars call imaginations or legends, they are more important in the study of human nature.

Zen masters tell us that the answer is in the question itself, you look into your question yourself.  My answer only leads you farther away from the question.

Who are you to ask that question?

–Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (October 18th,1870 - July 12th,1966)

(via: Myoan Shakuhachi)

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